One Little Word

Where God's Word Meets God's World

Devotions for Tuesday, July 26, 2016

23 “For this reason the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who wished to settle accounts with his slaves. 24 When he began the reckoning, one who owed him ten thousand talents was brought to him; 25 and, as he could not pay, his lord ordered him to be sold, together with his wife and children and all his possessions, and payment to be made. 26 So the slave fell on his knees before him, saying, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you everything.’ 27 And out of pity for him, the lord of that slave released him and forgave him the debt. 28 But that same slave, as he went out, came upon one of his fellow slaves who owed him a hundred denarii; and seizing him by the throat, he said, ‘Pay what you owe.’ 29 Then his fellow slave fell down and pleaded with him, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you.’ 30 But he refused; then he went and threw him into prison until he would pay the debt. 31 When his fellow slaves saw what had happened, they were greatly distressed, and they went and reported to their lord all that had taken place. 32 Then his lord summoned him and said to him, ‘You wicked slave! I forgave you all that debt because you pleaded with me. 33 Should you not have had mercy on your fellow slave, as I had mercy on you?’ 34 And in anger his lord handed him over to be tortured until he would pay his entire debt. 35 So my heavenly Father will also do to every one of you, if you do not forgive your brother or sister from your heart.”

St. Matthew 18:23-35. New Revised Version Bible ©1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America.

Discussion:
How has the forgiveness I receive from God shaped the way I relate to others?

Prayer:
Forgiving God, your mercy has no end. Grant us a keen awareness of our own sinfulness, and a deep appreciation for your grace. And stir us to love and forgive one another, as you have loved and forgiven us. Amen.

Devotions for Monday, July 25, 2016

 

25 Just then a lawyer stood up to test Jesus. “Teacher,” he said, “what must I do to inherit eternal life?” 26 He said to him, “What is written in the law? What do you read there?” 27 He answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself.” 28 And he said to him, “You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.”

29 But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” 30 Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. 31 Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. 32 So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. 33 But a Samaritan while traveling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. 34 He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. 35 The next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, ‘Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.’ 36 Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?” 37 He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”

St. Luke 10:25-37. New Revised Version Bible ©1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America.

Discussion:
How does this exchange and the following parable teach me about what it means to be a person of faith?

Prayer:
Lord Christ, you have promised to be with us even beyond the end of our time on this earth. Help us to trust in the certainty of that promise, and free us to live in ways that demonstrate God’s kingdom of love and compassion in all that we do. Amen.

The 11th Sunday after Pentecost; Proper 13C (7/31/16)

Lessons:
Ecclesiastes 1:2, 12-14; 2:18-23
Psalm 49:1-12 (3)
Colossians 3:1-11
St. Luke 12:13-21

Semicontinuous Series:
Hosea 11:1-11
Psalm 107:1-9, 43 (8)
Colossians 3:1-11
St. Luke 12:13-21

Prayer of the Day:
Benevolent God, you are the source, the guide, and the goal of our lives.  Teach us to love what is worth loving, to reject what is offensive to you, and to treasure what is precious in your sight, through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord. Amen.

12:13 Someone in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, tell my brother to divide the family inheritance with me.” 14 But he said to him, “Friend, who set me to be a judge or arbitrator over you?” 15 And he said to them, “Take care! Be on your guard against all kinds of greed; for one’s life does not consist in the abundance of possessions.” 16 Then he told them a parable: “The land of a rich man produced abundantly. 17 And he thought to himself, ‘What should I do, for I have no place to store my crops?’ 18 Then he said, ‘I will do this: I will pull down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. 19 And I will say to my soul, Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.’ 20 But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ 21 So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich toward God.”

St. Luke 12:13-21. New Revised Version Bible ©1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America.

A devotional message based on this text will be posted by Tuesday evening.

The 10th Sunday after Pentecost; Proper 12C (7/24/2016)

Lessons:
Genesis 18:20-32
Psalm 138 (8)
Colossians 2:6-15 [16-19]
St. Luke 11:1-13

Semicontinuous Series:
Hosea 1:2-10
Psalm 85 (13)
Colossians 2:6-15 [16-19]
St. Luke 11:1-13

Prayer of the Day:
Almighty and ever-living God, you are always more ready to hear than we are to pray, and you gladly give more than we either desire or deserve.  Pour upon us your abundant mercy.  Forgive us those things that weigh on our conscience, and give us those good things that come only through your Son, Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord. Amen.

11:1 [Jesus] was praying in a certain place, and after he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.” He said to them, “When you pray, say:
Father, hallowed be your name.
Your kingdom come.
3 Give us each day our daily bread.
4 And forgive us our sins,
for we ourselves forgive everyone indebted to us.
And do not bring us to the time of trial.”

And he said to them, “Suppose one of you has a friend, and you go to him at midnight and say to him, ‘Friend, lend me three loaves of bread; for a friend of mine has arrived, and I have nothing to set before him.’ And he answers from within, ‘Do not bother me; the door has already been locked, and my children are with me in bed; I cannot get up and give you anything.’ I tell you, even though he will not get up and give him anything because he is his friend, at least because of his persistence he will get up and give him whatever he needs.

“So I say to you, Ask, and it will be given you; search, and you will find; knock, and the door will be opened for you. 10For everyone who asks receives, and everyone who searches finds, and for everyone who knocks, the door will be opened. 11 Is there anyone among you who, if your child asks for a fish, will give a snake instead of a fish? 12 Or if the child asks for an egg, will give a scorpion? 13 If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will the heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!”

St. Luke 11:1-13. New Revised Version Bible ©1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America.

Lord, Teach Us to Pray

This Sunday at Saint Peter, I am presenting the second of a four-sermon series entitled “What Is?” The topic of the week is, “What Is Faith?” I want to invite our worshippers to take an interest in the conversations people are having (mostly in theological circles) about how to understand and articulate the relationship between the death and resurrection of Christ and our standing with God. I am convinced that this is an important undertaking. If we are going to reach the numbers of people who don’t know about our faith, or who have walked away from our faith, we will have to develop the capacity to tell our own faith story with clarity and in a compelling way. So what is faith? How does it make a discernible difference in our lives? What makes it worth commending it to another human being?

As a Lutheran Christian, of course, I can’t embark on this project without grounding it in Scripture. This weekend’s text provides an opportunity to do just that. Jesus himself is praying, as he often does, and when he has finished one of his followers asks him to teach them how to do that. Evidently John the Baptizer had provided some training in prayer for his closest followers, and the disciples of Jesus want something similar from him.

Jesus provides them with a model for prayer. We have come to think that he provides us with a prayer to pray, but it serves us better if we think of it as a model for how to pray. In this model, one can glimpse what faith in Christ is all about. It has to do with honoring God’s name (speaking respectfully about God, and not using the name of God for foolish purposes). It has to do with longing for the kingdom to come (as Luther taught us, the kingdom will come in and of itself, but in this prayer we ask that it might come to us). It has to do with trusting that God will provide us with what we need for daily life (we’re not asking, here, for remarkable prosperity, or a rainy-day fund that will sustain us for years to come… but we’re asking for the peace that comes from knowing that God will not abandon us). It  has to do with living in such a way that forgiveness stands at the center of all our relationships (our relationships with each other as well as our relationship with God). It has to do with trusting that God will be our strength when we are tempted to drift away from our faith (not that difficulties will never come our way, but that God will be our strength through everything that comes).

Jesus asks us to pray in this way, as believers who (1) honor God, (2) long for the kingdom, (3) trust in God’s providence, (4) forgive and are forgiven, and (5) lean on God during challenging times. What a great way to think about what it means to be a person of Christian faith! So much more so than speculation about who’s right or wrong, who’s in or out, who’s rewarded or punished…

And here’s the kicker: no matter how we pray, or what we ask to receive, we are promised that God will give us whatever we need (whether or not we know what that might be). What is faith? It is putting our lives in the hand of this One, who loves us enough to die for us.

David J. Risendal, Pastor

Exploring This Week’s Gospel:

  1. Why do the disciples ask Jesus to teach them to pray?
  2. Does he teach them a prayer, or a model for praying?
  3. How might this conversation have influenced their personal prayer lives?

Connecting with This Week’s Gospel:

  1. How would I describe what Christian faith means to me?
  2. What does the Lord’s Prayer teach me about faith?
  3. How can this prayer deepen my relationship with Christ?

The Ninth Sunday after Pentecost; Proper 11C (7/17/2016)

Lessons:
Genesis 18:1-10a
Psalm 15 (1)
Colossians 1:15-28
St. Luke 10:38-42

Semicontinuous Series:
Amos 8:1-12
Psalm 52 (8)
Colossians 1:15-28
St. Luke 10:38-42

Prayer of the Day:
Eternal God, you draw near to us in Christ, and you make yourself our guest. Amid the cares of our lives, make us attentive to your presence, that we may treasure your word above all else, through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord. Amen.

10:38 Now as they went on their way, he entered a certain village, where a woman named Martha welcomed him into her home. 39 She had a sister named Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet and listened to what he was saying. 40 But Martha was distracted by her many tasks; so she came to him and asked, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to do all the work by myself? Tell her then to help me.”41 But the Lord answered her, “Martha, Martha, you are worried and distracted by many things; 42 there is need of only one thing. Mary has chosen the better part, which will not be taken away from her.”

St. Luke 10:38-42. New Revised Version Bible ©1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America.

The Better Part

I have been on Sabbatical Leave for three months, and I can tell you: it was an extraordinary experience (more about that to come…), but it definitely is good to be back! Especially, it is good to return to Saint Peter during Day Camp week, with 30+ kids racing around the building singing, laughing, learning, loving… Many thanks to our volunteer crew at Saint Peter and the camp staff from Rainbow Trail who have made this week possible!

It is good to be back, and this Sunday I will begin a four-week sermon series entitled “What Is?” We’ll ask what is Sabbath (7/17), what is Christian faith (7/24), what is Christian faithfulness (7/21) and what are signs of a flourishing congregation (8/7). I hope you’ll join me for worship as I share some of what I’ve experienced these past three months, and as we pray together throughout these weeks about where God is leading us in the months to come. Continue reading

Pastor Dave is on Sabbatical Leave; April 11 through July 10

Pastor Dave, the author and webmaster of One Little Word, is on Sabbatical leave until July 11, 2016. He will not be composing or posting new devotional messages during this time, although he may be posting findings from his sabbatical activities. If you are looking for devotional messages or sermons, we welcome you to view his posts from three years ago.

Easter 4C (April 17)
devotional message
sermon

Easter 5C (April 24)
devotional message
sermon

Easter 6C (May 1)
devotional message
sermon

Easter 7C (May 8)
devotional message
sermon

The Feast of Pentecost (May 15)
devotional message
sermon

The Holy Trinity (May 22)
devotional message
sermon

Pentecost 2C / Proper 4C (May 29)
devotional message
sermon

Pentecost 3C / Proper 5C (June 5)
devotional message
sermon

Pentecost 4C / Proper 6C (June 12)
– devotional message Luke 7:36-8:3
sermon

Pentecost 5C / Proper 7C (June 19)
devotional message
sermon

Pentecost 6C / Proper 8C (June 26)
devotional message
sermon

Pentecost 7C / Proper 9C (July 3)
devotional message
sermon

Pentecost 8C / Proper 10C (July 10)
devotional message
sermon

The Third Sunday of Easter; Year C (4/10/2016)

Lessons:
Acts 9:1-6 [7-20]
Psalm 30 (11)
Revelation 5:11-14
St. John 21:1-19

Prayer of the Day:
Eternal and all-merciful God, with all the angels and all the saints we laud your majesty and might.  By the resurrection of your Son, show yourself to us and inspire us to follow Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.

21:1 After these things Jesus showed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tiberias; and he showed himself in this way. Gathered there together were Simon Peter, Thomas called the Twin, Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples. Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.” They said to him, “We will go with you.” They went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing.

Just after daybreak, Jesus stood on the beach; but the disciples did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to them, “Children, you have no fish, have you?” They answered him, “No.” He said to them, “Cast the net to the right side of the boat, and you will find some.” So they cast it, and now they were not able to haul it in because there were so many fish. That disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, “It is the Lord!” When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on some clothes, for he was naked, and jumped into the sea. But the other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from the land, only about a hundred yards off.

When they had gone ashore, they saw a charcoal fire there, with fish on it, and bread. 10 Jesus said to them, “Bring some of the fish that you have just caught.” 11 So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, a hundred fifty-three of them; and though there were so many, the net was not torn. 12 Jesus said to them, “Come and have breakfast.” Now none of the disciples dared to ask him, “Who are you?” because they knew it was the Lord. 13 Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and did the same with the fish. 14 This was now the third time that Jesus appeared to the disciples after he was raised from the dead.

15 When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon son of John, do you love me more than these?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my lambs.” 16 A second time he said to him, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Tend my sheep.” 17 He said to him the third time, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” Peter felt hurt because he said to him the third time, “Do you love me?” And he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep. 18 Very truly, I tell you, when you were younger, you used to fasten your own belt and to go wherever you wished. But when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will fasten a belt around you and take you where you do not wish to go.” 19 (He said this to indicate the kind of death by which he would glorify God.) After this he said to him, “Follow me.”

St. John 21:1-19 New Revised Version Bible (C)1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America.

Do You Love Me?

They must have been searing words. Words that cut Peter to the core, and stop him in his tracks. “Simon son of John, do you love me?” Any other time those words might not have had such a strong impact on Peter. Any other time he might have seen them as an introduction to something Jesus wanted to teach him, or an effort to start a conversation. But not this time. This time they sear him like a knife and stop him in his tracks. “Simon son of John, do you love me?”

Jesus has reason to wonder. It was just a few days earlier that the soldiers arrested him and tortured him and were holding him captive. At the same time, Peter finds himself standing near a campfire with some of the locals. One of them — a young woman — a servant-girl — thinks she recognizes him. She asks if he belongs to Jesus’ group. Peter vehemently denies it to her: “Woman, I do not know him.” A little later another bystander seems to recognize him, yet again he protests: “Man, I am not!” Then about an hour later it happens again, and Peter’s response is the same: “Man, I do now know what you are talking about!” Peter can’t have known it, but Jesus is watching him from a distance. As he speaks his third denial, a rooster crows (just as Jesus had predicted it would), Jesus turns and looks at Peter, and Peter immediately realizes what he has done. You can imagine how the image of his Lord’s disappointed (yet loving?) face must have burned its way into Peter’s memory. That exchange of looks is one that will follow him for the rest of his life.

Fast forward to some time, not long after the resurrection. Peter and half dozen of the others have returned to the Sea of Tiberias, and to their former vocation. They are fishing. It is one of those nights: for hours they throw out the nets, and draw them back empty. About daybreak, a man on the shore calls out to them: “Any luck?” When they tell him how poorly they have done, he recommends that they throw the nets to the right side of the boat. Upon doing so, there are suddenly so many fish that they can’t haul the net back into the boat. One of the disciples immediately realizes that they are in the presence of Jesus. Peter jumps into the water and swims ashore, and the rest follow in the boat.

Back on shore, Jesus asks Peter not once, not twice, but three times: “Simon son of John, do you love me?” Jesus asks him not so much to test him, as to invite him to begin again. These three affirmations of love become Peter’s opportunity to answer his three statements of denial. They become, as well, an invitation to ministry. Jesus commands Peter to feed his sheep — to tend his flock. It won’t be easy, Jesus says. It may even cost you your life. But after his failure on Friday, even that doesn’t seem so bad to Peter.

Loved by Jesus, Peter goes on to become a leader in the early church. One who tends to Jesus’ followers. One who feeds even those most vulnerable of believers. One who eventually shares the death that Jesus himself experienced. Perhaps it is the depth of Jesus’ grace that turns him back towards service. Perhaps it is the knowledge that this one who asks about his love has already loved him so fully and completely.

May the love of Christ turn our lives around as well, turning us back towards lives of service.

David J. Risendal, Pastor

Exploring This Week’s Gospel:

  1. Why is Peter afraid to admit that he is a follower of Jesus?
  2. What must he feel when the rooster crows, and his eyes meet the eyes of his Lord?
  3. How must these words of invitation and encouragement be a word of life to Peter?

Connecting with This Week’s Gospel:

  1. When have my words or actions denied my faith in Jesus?
  2. What was it that caused me to realize my failure? How did I feel?
  3. Do I believe in God’s grace — a grace that can overcome even the worst of my sins?

The Second Sunday of Easter; Year C (4/3/2016)

Lessons:
Acts 5:27-32
Psalm 118:14-29 (28) or Psalm 150 (6)
Revelation 1:4-8
St. John 20:19-31

Prayer of the Day:
Almighty and eternal God, the strength of those who believe and the hope of those who doubt, may we, who have not seen, have faith in you and receive the fullness of Christ’s blessing, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.

19 When it was evening on that day, the first day of the week, and the doors of the house where the disciples had met were locked for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” 20 After he said this, he showed them his hands and his side. Then the disciples rejoiced when they saw the Lord. 21 Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, so I send you.” 22 When he had said this, he breathed on them and said to them, “Receive the Holy Spirit. 23 If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven them; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained.”

24 But Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with them when Jesus came. 25 So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”

26 A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” 27 Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.” 28 Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” 29 Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”

30 Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not written in this book. 31 But these are written so that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through believing you may have life in his name.

St. John 20:19-31 New Revised Version Bible (C)1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America

 

That You May Come to Believe

We always set up extra chairs for Easter Sunday. The assembly may not be as large as on Christmas Eve, but it is almost aways our busiest Sunday. This makes sense, of course, because the resurrection of Jesus stands at the very heart of our faith. It is God’s proclamation that death will not have the final say. That grace is God’s way. That love finally wins out. That, in the words of St. Paul, “we have been buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life. For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we will certainly be united with him in a resurrection like his.” (Romans 6:4-5)

So we always set up extra chairs for Easter Sunday. The question for this week is: how many chairs should we move back to the storage room? The Second Sunday of Easter doesn’t always draw the smallest crowd of the year (that honor is usually reserved for Labor Day weekend or the Sunday after Christmas). But compared to Easter Sunday, there are precious few of us at worship.

It’s a shame, because this Gospel lesson has much to say to those who might miss worship this weekend. It is story of peace, forgiveness, patience and ultimately: faith.

It tells the story of Thomas, one of Jesus’ closest followers. History has labelled him the doubter, but truth be told: his story is not much different from the other ten. The story begins with ten of them huddled in fear, on the evening of the day Jesus was raised from the dead. (Thomas is not with them.) Jesus appears to them, blesses them, shows them his wounds, and they respond with joy. When they try to describe this to Thomas, it is more than he can comprehend.

The next week, Thomas is in the same state of mind they were in seven days before, only this time he is with them. Jesus appears to them, blesses them, and shows his wounds to Thomas, who then replies, “My Lord and my God!” (Arguably a stronger, more faithful response than that of his fellow disciples a week earlier…)

What is this story about? It is nothing less than an illustration of the central point of St. John’s Gospel; an account that was “written so that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through believing you may have life in his name.”

Jesus is willing to do anything to help them come to believe. He does so on that first Easter evening with the ten. He does so a week later with Thomas. He continues to do so with us today. The disciples exhibit faithfulness in trying to help Thomas to come to faith, but the most important thing they do is to keep Thomas in the fold until he has his own chance to meet Jesus. They don’t despise him, shame him, or reject him, even though he refuses to believe what they are sharing with him. But they hold him close, and eventually Jesus touches him.

In doing so they show their love for him, and model for us what faithfulness looks like.

David J. Risendal, Pastor

Exploring This Week’s Gospel:

  1. What does Jesus do to help the ten disciples believe in his resurrection?
  2. How do they treat Thomas when he returns to them?
  3. What might have happened if they had separated themselves from him?

Connecting with This Week’s Gospel:

  1. How has God enabled us to become people of faith? People who trust Christ?
  2. How do we treat those who disagree with us about faith? Or values? Or morals?
  3. How do we stay connected with those who don’t yet believe in Jesus?

Utter Nonsense? Or Gospel Truth?

Date: March 27, 2016
Liturgical Day: The Resurrection of Our Lord; Easter Sunday (Year C)

the Easter message
Jesus Christ is ris’n today
God’s gift to the world

Summary:
The disciples hear word of the resurrection, and at first consider it to be “utter nonsense.” Many in our day may have reached the same conclusion. But to us it is the Gospel Truth. A rich treasure from God . Christ is risen! Christ is risen, indeed! Alleluia! Amen!

Download Sermon: 2016 Easter Sunday C

Just as I Have Loved You

Date: March 24, 2016
Liturgical Day: Maundy Thursday (Year C)

an invitation
beginning of the three days
living the Christ-life

Summary:
As he washes his disciples’  feet, calls them to sacred love, and includes them in his last meal, Jesus commissions his disciples (and us!) to live with extraordinary love. This is the Christ-life.

Download Sermon: 2016 Maundy Thursday C

« Older posts

© 2016 One Little Word

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

%d bloggers like this: